CBD

What is CBD? - Advantages, effects & worth knowing

What is CBD

Does CBD get you high? What are the real benefits? Will it be detected in a drug test? Here is everything you need to know about CBD.

There is no question that CBD is the hip wellness product of the moment. If you live in a state where it's currently legal, you may feel like all of a sudden, CBD is no longer just around, it's everywhere. Coffee shops sell CBD lattes, spa's offer CBD facials, and cosmetic companies are rushing to bring ointments CBD or hemp oil in their formulas. And everyone, from the anxious colleague to the arthritis-suffering father, wants to get their hands on some CBD gummy bears.

But while CBD is making its way into pretty much every corner of the wellness world (hello, vegan CBD brownies!), Many people still find CBD a little confusing - especially when it comes to figuring out how to use it and making sure that it is Stuff you buy is actually legal. Below we've asked experts to answer the most pressing questions about CBD.

First things first: what is CBD?

CBD, short for cannabidiol, is a chemical compound from the Cannabid sativa plant, also known as marijuana or hemp, according to the US National Library of Medicine.

It is a naturally occurring substance that is used in products such as oils and edibles to provide a sense of relaxation and calm. Unlike its cousin, delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the main active ingredient in marijuana, CBD is not psychoactive.

Does CBD make you high?

No. the CBD flowers consists of two main ingredients: CBD and THC. "CBD is the non-psychoactive part of the plant, which means you won't feel any effects like euphoria," says Junella Chin, DO, an osteopathic doctor and medical cannabis expert on cannabisMD. "You will not feel sedated or altered in any way."

There are two possible exceptions to this. The first is that some people simply react differently to CBD for reasons unknown. According to Dr. Chin say about 5% of people feel changed after taking CBD. "Usually these are the same people who have side effects from Advil or Tylenol," she says. You never know how the body will react to a new preparation. So if this is your first time using CBD, it should be done safely and under supervision.

It's also important to buy CBD that has been third-party tested to ensure quality (more on that later). Since the FDA does not regulate CBD, it is possible to buy a product that is more or less potent than advertised, or even contains small amounts of THC.

What does hemp have to do with all of this?

You have probably heard the terms cannabis, marijuana, and hemp used in connection with CBD. The Cannabis sativa plant has two main types, hemp and marijuana. Both contain CBD, but the CBD content in hemp is much higher and the THC content is very low compared to marijuana (less than 0,2%).

When one speaks of hemp oil, one means the oil that is extracted from the seeds of the hemp plant. Hemp oil does not contain any cannabinoids - neither CBD nor THC. This ingredient is rich in healthy fats and is widely used in beauty products for its moisturizing properties.

What Are the Health Benefits of CBD?

The only CBD drug currently approved by the FDA is Epidiolex, which the agency approved for the treatment of certain types of epilepsy last year. But many people swear by it that CBD helps with a whole host of other health problems, including back pain, osteoarthritis, and even cancer.

"Every day, patients come to my practice asking about CBD," says Houman Danesh, director of integrative pain management at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City. But while there is plenty of anecdotal evidence, he says, "it is still very difficult to say" what the real benefits are as there is a serious lack of research.

“Right now the pharmacies are just trying to figure it out and say, 'Yes, this works,'” he says, “but that's not the way medicine is practiced - it should be based on evidence and there is not much evidence to really support these claims. "

Is it still worth trying CBD for pain relief?

There are two main types of pain, says Dr. Danesh: musculoskeletal and nerve pain. "It could be useful for either condition," he says.

The tricky part is that there is some evidence that CBD works best for pain relief when combined with a little THC, says Dr. Danesh. "Depending on the type of pain, you may only be able to take CBD, but sometimes you need both CBD and THC." This makes it harder to get a product that actually helps, as each state has different regulations. In New York, where Dr. Danesh practices, for example, CBD is available without a prescription. But once you add THC, you need a prescription.

The dosage that will relieve pain in one patient will do little in another. "Until we can explore that, it's the Wild West," says Dr. Danesh.

The conclusion? "I think CBD is a safe thing to try," says Dr. Danesh. But he urges patients to push for more research by putting pressure on MPs to pass national laws that will allow scientists to take a closer look at CBD and the diseases that respond to it.

What About My Anxiety - Can CBD Help With It?

CBD might be worth trying to manage anxiety symptoms. "CBD tells your body to calm down and reminds you that you are safe," says Dr. Chin. “It calms the nervous system so that you don't find yourself in an increased 'fight or flight' response,” she says, so people with anxiety can find that it helps them feel more relaxed.

However, one of the biggest misconceptions about CBD is that it is a miracle cure. "A lot of people think CBD is a panacea, but it's not," says Dr. Chin. "One should also maintain a healthy lifestyle with plenty of exercise and a healthy diet - CBD is not a panacea."

I've heard of edibles, tinctures, vape pens ... What's the best way to take CBD?

It really depends on what you're aiming for and why you're taking CBD in the first place.

Some people don't want to ingest anything, so they prefer a topical CBD cream or ointment. "You can apply it to muscles, joints and ligaments for a nice localized effect," says Dr. Chin.

The biggest differences between tinctures, edibles, and vape pens are the speed of delivery and the duration of the effects. The effects of vape pens are quicker, but also wear off quicker - usually after about two hours, says Dr. Chin. “Assuming you wake up in the morning and have a strained back, you should be ingesting CBD through a vape pen that works within 10 minutes.

Tinctures and edibles take longer to work, but last four or five hours. "CBD drops look like a little liquid that you put under your tongue and you feel relief within half an hour," says Dr. Chin. “If you prefer to taste something, choose a food, be it a capsule, a gummy bear, or a pastry.

"It calms the nervous system so that you don't find yourself in an increased 'fight-or-flight' response," she says, so people with anxiety can find that it helps them feel more relaxed.

However, one of the biggest misconceptions about CBD is that it is a miracle cure. "A lot of people think CBD is a panacea, but it's not," says Dr. Chin. "One should also maintain a healthy lifestyle with plenty of exercise and a healthy diet - CBD is not a panacea."

I've heard of edibles, tinctures, vape pens ... What's the best way to take CBD?

It really depends on what you're aiming for and why you're taking CBD in the first place.

Some people don't want to ingest anything, so they prefer a topical CBD cream or ointment. "You can apply it to muscles, joints and ligaments for a nice localized effect," says Dr. Chin.

The biggest differences between tinctures, edibles, and vape pens are the speed of delivery and the duration of the effects. The effects of vape pens are quicker, but also wear off quicker - usually after about two hours, says Dr. Chin. “Assuming you wake up in the morning and have a strained back, you should be ingesting CBD through a vape pen that works within 10 minutes.

Tinctures and edibles take longer to work, but last four or five hours. "A tincture looks like a little liquid that you put under your tongue and you feel relief within half an hour," says Dr. Chin. “If you prefer to taste something, choose a food, be it a capsule, a gummy bear, or a pastry.

What should I look out for when shopping for CBD products?

"There are literally hundreds of brands of CBD out there right now," said Brandon Beatty, founder and CEO of Bluebird Botanicals and executive vice president of the US Hemp Roundtable. Here are a few things to look out for when shopping.

What does the label look like?

We don't mean the color or the Millennium font. If it's a dietary supplement, Beatty says it should have a back with an FDA disclaimer and warning notice. “Ideally, you should also be able to see the results of third-party laboratory tests.

While we're at it, has it been tested by a third party?

Almost all of the experts Health spoke to agreed that your CBD products should be tested by a third party to confirm the accuracy of the label. This is a real concern in the industry - take, for example, the 2017 Journal of the American Medical Association study that tested 84 CBD products and found 26% lower doses than what is advertised on the bottle . Look for a quality assurance stamp or certificate of analysis from a third party (i.e. not the actual brand), or check the retailer's website if you can't find it on the product's label.

What's the dosage?

This question is confusing to many people. "A lot of brands don't do a good job of providing clear dosage instructions to the consumer," said Chris Roth, CEO and co-founder of Highline Wellness. When thinking about dosage, you should also consider whether your CBD is full-spectrum or isolate: full range could include other cannabinoids like cannabidivarin or cannabigerol included (this is important because "there is something that can be said 'Entourage effect'calls when they are all more effective than either of them alone,' explains Roth), while isolate is 100% CBD. "Some people may only need 10 milligrams of the full spectrum of CBD, but even 80 or 100 milligrams of isolate won't have the same effect," he says.

Does it claim to cure any diseases?

If so, you should stay away from it. "You should avoid any company that makes disease claims," ​​says Beatty. "If so, it means that they are either willing to break the rules or they are not aware of the rules."

Is there a batch number?

You know you check your raw chicken or packet of salad every time there's a call back to make sure what you bought isn't going to make you sick? You should be able to do the same with CBD products. "This is an important indicator of whether manufacturers are using good manufacturing practices," says Beatty. "There should be a way to identify this product in the event it was improperly manufactured so that the company can conduct a recall."

Does the product contain any additional ingredients?

As with all dietary supplements, you should know what else you are consuming in addition to the main ingredient. For example, sometimes I find CBD manufacturers adding melatonin, ”says Dr. Chin.

Will you buy it in the store?

In many states, you can buy CBD products at malls, grocery stores, and even cafes. But when in doubt, health food stores are a safe place to go to buy CBD, says Beatty. "Usually they have a review process that does some of the work for you."

That all sounds good, but is it also legal?

First of all, a little background. Industrial hemp was legal in the United States until Congress passed the Marijuana Tax Act in 1937. ("Some of our early presidents grew hemp," notes Sarah Lee Gossett Parrish, an Oklahoma-based cannabis lawyer). Almost 80 years later, the 2014 Agriculture Act took the position that states could regulate the production of hemp and thus also of CBD. Then, last year, President Trump signed a new agriculture law that legalized the cultivation of hemp at the federal level.

That means, "Consumers everywhere, if they are state compliant, can grow hemp and use hemp products," explains Parrish, "and that includes CBD."

In other words, the latest bill removed hemp from the remit of the Drug Enforcement Administration, or DEA for short. "Hemp can now be grown freely under federal law, which is of course of great importance," says Parrish. “But while it is legal under federal law, each state must determine its own policy.

These guidelines are very different. Marijuana and CBD are currently completely legal in Alaska, California, Colorado, Maine, Massachusetts, Michigan, Nevada, Oregon, Vermont, Washington, and Washington DC for both medical and recreational use. 23 states allow it in some form, for example for medical purposes. In another 14 states, only CBD oil is allowed. However, both are illegal in Idaho, Nebraska, and South Dakota. For more information, the Americans for Safe Access has a helpful guide to the specific laws of each state.

"It's kind of ironic," says Parrish. "On marijuana, the federal government says 'no' and a number of states say 'yes, it's OK' - but on hemp, the federal government says 'yes, it's OK', but there are still some states that won't allow it."

Can you travel with CBD?

That same Agriculture Act of 2018 means you can now travel between states with legal CBD products. "Flying CBD shouldn't be a problem now," says Parrish. However, if you are traveling with CBD oil, be aware of the TSA restrictions that govern how much fluids you can take on a plane, she adds. (You can also send CBD products through the mail, as well as "Compliance companies can ship their hemp-derived CBD products anywhere in the US," Parrish notes).

Will CBD Show Up On A Drug Test?

No, as long as you buy CBD with no THC added that has been tested by third parties, says Dr. Chin. However, she points out that athletes who often have to take more sensitive drug tests could potentially test positive for traces of THC if they have consumed CBD products.

Last question: can I give it to my dog?

Tempted to give your dog one of these CBD dog biscuits? "In general, we believe that CBD products are safe and may have some benefit for pet anxiety," said John Faught, a veterinarian in Austin, Texas.

However, the challenge with using CBD products for pets is the same as for humans: the lack of research. “I think there are good products out there today, but I also don't know how to tell them apart right now,” says Faught.

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